The University of Manchester

University of Manchester | Eric McInnes 2019

The University of Manchester is the UK’s largest single-site university, with around 6,800 academic and research staff and a student body of approximately 40,000. The university can trace its roots to 1824, and was England’s first civic university. It has a proud research history, laying claim to 25 Nobel Prize winners amongst its current and former staff and students. Famous firsts including splitting of the atom and creation of the first programmable computer. The University was ranked 33rd in the world (6th in the UK) in the 2019 Academic Ranking of World Universities. The Department of Chemistry is one of the largest in Europe, with over 80 academic staff, >140 postdoctoral researchers and >300 postgraduate research students. It was ranked 27th globally for chemistry in the QS Rankings 2018, and holds an Athena Swan Silver award for its initiatives in equality, diversity and inclusion. Manchester has a long history in EPR spectroscopy, and is host to the EPSRC National EPR Facility.


Conference Venue

The conference will be held in the Alliance Manchester Business School (AMBS), at the heart of the main University campus, less than a mile from the city centre. The newly refurbished AMBS is part of University Green, a major new teaching, learning, leisure and retail development. Accommodation and evening catering will be in the 4-star Crowne Plaza Manchester Oxford Road hotel, also on University Green. The conference banquet will be held in the grand setting of Manchester Museum.


Alliance Manchester Business School Main Building

City of Manchester

Manchester started life as a Roman settlement, but turned into the world’s first industrial city during the industrial revolution of the 18th and 19th centuries, even being the site of the world’s first railway station, also leading to the establishment the University’s predecessor institutions, which in turn opened the doors of education to the British working classes. The Chartist, trade union and suffragette movements can all trace their roots back to Manchester. The statues of John Dalton and James Joules that welcome visitors to Manchester Town Hall demonstrate the importance of the city to the development of science and technology and vice versa. The city has an international sporting pedigree and one of the richest and most influential arts and music scenes.